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I am a mystic madman, a wandering wildman, scholar of esoterica, dilettante sadhu, dready-headed hippie (only have a few jata on the back of my head right now, though more be forming of this third set of knotted hair), gentle yogi, fierce foe of falsity. I was a preacher, but I renounced that. I was married, but she renounced me. I was a grad student at one of the top universities in the world on my way to becoming a professor, but I realized they taught lies there too. I am protector of souls, lover of mountains, smoker of herb, fond of hot springs, oceans and lakes and rivers and rain and sunshine, devotee of Devi.

Hindu Gods and Goddesses

Saturday, March 22, 2014

Mamasita and God who says "Moooo"


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Pondering certain memes and meanings within commonly repeated colloquialisms, the subtle spells sanAtana dharma weaves into the daily conversation of so many people and peoples in so many tongues, which keeps them inadvertently tied by intonation to those most ancient wisdoms, those at least as close as humanity has to “eternal teachings.” The most obvious little sacred spell designed to keep humanity in tune with the ancient ways and vibrations: “God” is derived from the Sanskrit root go, which means “cow” as in the Holy Cows graze in the pasture and intone “AUM” backwards, and which grace humanity willing with their own milk. The simple fact that another creature, biologically unrelated to humanity save very distantly, essentially nurses us as if one of their own is at least analogous to the Providence of the Divine, caring for mere mortals so seeming separate from the Divine. Thus when people call on “God” using that English word they are invoking that ancient Deity worshiped yet in India in the actual form of the bovine beasty, and in a globally recognized expression of anthropomorphisized or transcendent Benevolence, in fact even overtly worshiped by most peoples' ancestors in some guise or other as Bull Gods and other Sacred Cows.

Every time Abraham and Sarah are named in a Hebrew prayer their speech cannot but be recognized as an echo if not occulted invocation of Brahma and Saraswati, the Creator and His Consort according to sanAtana dharma, and at least the namesakes for the Hebrew patriarch and his wife who indeed came from quite near Indus Valley Civilization before crossing southern Asia to reach Palestine. When a Muslim speaks the primary confession of Islam he or she is saying one of the kalima, a veiled reminder of Kali Ma, Black Mama Goddess of the Universe according to the teachings of sanAtana dharma. To the Muslim, “community” is Ummah, at least vibrationally invoking Uma Himavati, another form of the Goddess Mama of the Universe. Christians devotion to their Shepherd is more than analogous to Gopis worship of Krishna the Cowherd, a functional pattern applied again or copied from sanAtana dharma. “Yoga” is root to the English word “yolk,” as in the brace used to tie a horse or other creature to a cart or a plow. “Allah” without the “h” is one of Durga's names, thus intonationally Muslims are calling upon the “HIndu” Goddess of the Universe when they say their “God is good.”

When a crowd cheers, “Hooray!! Hoorah!!” their words echo as “Hari-Hara!!” in fact invoking Vishnu/Hari and Shiva/Hara who in Hari-Hara form are the Maintainer and Destroyer Avatars of God sharing One Body. When in the Spanish tongue a woman is called “mamasita” those syllables intoned invoke Devi Ma Sita, Wife of God Rama who is another form of Vishnu/Krishna. Devi Sita is an Avatar of Prithvi, Mother Earth, and is said by the Ramayana to be a small framed woman. So indeed in some guise Mother Earth is worshiped by the Spanish when they call someone mamasita/“little mama.” An Aztec Native American Indian calls himself or herself “Astika” which in India's sacred speak Sanskrit means “faithful one, or one who believes in the existence of God/another world.”

Despite whatever theological or cultural tangent, placed within the words and ways of common people everywhere remain means of tying the whole show together, to maintain those strands of sacred stories and names yet woven through virtually every culture and mythology which call upon the most ancient and abiding, sanAtana dharma. Thus despite overt grand differences between peoples, such spells spun by Lalitha or whatever Devi or Deva within whatever peoples' ways remind them or the spirit within them, however unacknowledged consciously, of their kinship and connections to the others and to the same ancient sacred stories and ancestral understandings of the Divine. At least over the last five to ten thousand years there is indeed a coherent and unified narrative of the drama and dharma of us all and our ancestors, and spells woven within everyone's words in every tongue, that has been and shall continue “keepin' it together forever,” sanAtana dharma.

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